BYOD in the Classroom

Lindsey Lipsky M.Ed.

Picture

Recently I went to a school on the outskirts of the Western Chicago suburbs to lead a Teacher Training in-service. What I saw in one classroom almost stopped me dead in my tracks. It was a sign about proper BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) use in the classroom.  I was amazed.

BYOD, or Bring Your Own Device, refers to the policy of allowing students to bring their personal mobile devices, such as smartphones, laptops and PDAs into the classroom for use and connectivity while learning. A new approach to integrating students’ technology into the classroom, BYOD is slowly gaining ground in the K-12 arena.

So why was I stopped dead in my tracks by a sign? Almost three years earlier, as a special education teacher, my school enacted a zero tolerance policy for any and all cell phones. A common scenario in my classroom went something like this:

Me: “OK, John, I see the phone in your pocket. It’s actually blinking, and singing a lovely rap song for us.”
Student: “But, but, Mrs. Lipsky, it’s not FAIR. My mom tells me I need to keep my phone on me for emergencies. Besides, Elysha and Jake both have cell phones in their desks… See, they just texted me.”
Me: (laughing slightly) “Ok, guys, I’m sorry, but you know the rules. Hand over the cell phones, or put them in my top desk drawer for safe keeping. You can pick them up after school.”
Students: Groaning in unison, all get up to put cell phones in my desk.

In my school, it was no secret that students had cell phones at school.  An unspoken rule though was that as long as the phones were out of sight (or sound) during class time, they could be out of mind (and thus without punishment).  This was in stark contrast to the view of our Administrators, who if found phones on students, would provide harsh penalties.

Due to this, throughout my day, my desk drawers became littered with confiscated student cell phones and mobile devices; a proverbial graveyard of untapped technological learning potential.

Interestingly enough, a 2013 study by the Pew Research Center found that 78% of Americans aged 12 to 17 have cell phones, and nearly 1 in 4 (23%) of teenagers have a personal tablet. Another study found that 38% of kids under age 2 have used smartphones or tablets, Despite the fact that technology is becoming an ever-increasingly important aspect of kids’ lives, a June 2014 report by EdNET Insight found only “20% of elementary schools, 28% of middle schools and 40% of high schools” currently implement any type of BYOD policy in school.

Given the huge integration of technology into the lives of our students, why haven’t more schools begun implementing BYOD in the classroom? After all, aren’t more children today prone to using/having personal devices at home? To begin with, here are a few very valid and real barriers or concerns:

  1. Personal device inequities in the classroom (This is a biggie for me – how have others dealt with this? )
  2. Lagging Wi-Fi, or school bandwidth issues which make it difficult to support multiple devices on campus
  3. Need for more IT specialists and support  to help with increased tech demands
  4. A mind shift in general teaching practices, movement away from cell phone use as a distraction, to learning augmentation
  5. Need for broad behavior interventions and school regulations on proper use of technology

Despite the lengthy list of barriers to implementing BYOD, many schools have found that with successful support, tech integration, and training, BYOD can be an amazing tool for students. Some of the positives schools have seen when enacting BYOD on campuses include:

  1. More engaged students and learning environments
  2. A classroom that more closely mirrors outside technological realities and allows for good conversations/modeling of proper use
  3. Better collaboration across classes, students, parents and other teachers
  4. Differentiated learning that can extend beyond classroom
  5. Less cost associated with tech purchases like those for 1:1 models

Still interested in possibly implementing BYOD in your classroom? Get started by reading some of my favorite BYOD articles below:

What are your thoughts on BYOD in the classroom? Has your school begun implementing this concept? Why or why not? Leave a comment below, or let’s discuss on twitter @LindseyLipsky

 #EdTechWish: What Tech Do You Wish for in 2015? 

By Lindsey Lipsky, M.Ed.
This article has been featured on Edutopia with a wonderful post by my friend and amazing PLN Colleague, Rusul Alrubail. Check out the post here.

My brother, Ash, is a computer engineer– which basically means I have absolutely no idea what he does on a day-to day-basis. I do know, however, that he works for a “User Experience Design & Engineering Consultancy” based in Chicago which was recently named one of Inc. 500’s Fastest Growing Companies (fancy!)

Not that I like to brag or anything, but my brother is smart. Like really smart. He designs and creates and prototypes all kinds of technology; Tom Cruise in Minority Report kind of technology.

One night over a wonderful Sushi Dinner, my brother and I were discussing what he does.   After much technical jargon talk (on his part, of course) we got around to the subject of Educational Technology.My question for him was simple: Why does it seem like new technology keeps coming out that “accidentally” works well in the classroom? Shouldn’t Tech Developers (such as yourself) be reaching out to Schools/ Teachers/ Districts FIRST to create and design tech rather than the other way around?

His response? Show us the Benjamins.  (OK, he didn’t really say that, but that would’ve been amazing if he had!) His response was really that there is not much funding in EdTech due to the high costs associated with developing new products around classrooms; often expenses that are too high for many schools/districts to bear.

That got me thinking– What would happen if we went a back way into helping propel new EdTech design with teachers in mind. What if we started by asking a large number of people (educators mostly) what type of tech or design needs they saw in the classroom? Rather than having large Tech giants start projects that just so happen to work well for our classrooms, why not start by asking what educators want first? This idea sparked a hashtag and subsequent chat on Twitter: #EdTechWish and #EdTech2015

See first Tweets below:

Picture

We got an amazing response from educators all over the country discussing their EdTech ideas, needs and problems they needed help solving when facing implementation of good tech in the classroom.

Read the initial Storify and conversation on #EdTechWish here, as well as the #EdTechWish Chat during a week-long #SlowChatEd January discussion.

Also, feel free to keep the #EdTechWish hashtag going by answering this question on Twitter: What tech do you wish for in your classroom for 2015?